A single shard

He then hears the temple bell and returns to Min's house to start his work cutting wood. When Tree-ear returns to Min's house with the clay cart, Min's wife gives him his food.

A single shard characters

We learn that Tree-ear got his name because his ears look like the wrinkled mushrooms found on dead trees. He ran to tell the farmer, who was thankful for Tree-ear's honesty and told him he could have the rice that had fallen on the ground. Tree-ear is fascinated with the nearby potters in his village, especially Min, and often watches them work. Both vases are broken but one has broken in large pieces, allowing Tree-ear to take a single shard of the broken vase and continue his journey. Tree-ear is an orphan who lives under a bridge with Crane-man, a physically disabled man who took him in when Tree-ear was only a small child. Min is not satisfied with the first 3 pots, although they look perfect to Tree-ear. When he drops a piece Min has made, Tree-ear begins to work for him to pay off his debt, but stays on after the debt is paid because he longs to learn to create beautiful pots himself. Min agrees, but cannot pay for the work.

He asks Crane-man who will now help Min's wife. He enjoys passing the stalls and looking at the things that people are selling. Min stays in his house so Tree-ear works in the garden.

A single shard

However, Min wants Tree-ear to cut wood for the communal kiln. One afternoon word spreads throughout Ch'ulp'o that a royal emissary is coming to offer commissions to the best potters both in their village and another village down the coast. Tree-ear is excited because his food bag is filled with rice. The plot is compelling, too. When he arrives Min's wife tells him that Min is at the draining site. Tree-ear doesn't care about this; he is very happy to think he will be able to watch Min make pots. In 12th-century Korea, the village of Ch'ulp'o is famous for its pottery. Most potters who live there are very secretive, but not Min. He does some work for her in her garden, but feels that this is not enough. We learn that Tree-ear got his name because his ears look like the wrinkled mushrooms found on dead trees. He was not happy with them.

He gives Tree-ear the same job for the new day. Crane-man died a few days before when a farmer's cart broke the rotten bridge railing, causing him to fall into the cold water. A Single Shard won the Newbery Medal in The plot is compelling, too.

a single shard theme

After some thought Min agrees. She charts Tree-Ear's transformation from apprentice to artist and portrays his selflessness during a pilgrimage to Songdo to show Min's work to the royal court—he faithfully continues even after robbers shatter the work and he has only a single shard to show.

A single shard reading level

When Tree-ear returns to Min's house with the clay cart, Min's wife gives him his food. One day Tree-ear goes into Min's yard and investigates the work that he was drying in the sun. Tree-ear reveals his attack by the robbers and then shows the single shard. His dream is to make a prunus vase. Kim tells Tree-ear to return to Ch'ulp'o with the news. At the end of the morning's work he realises that it is now Min's responsibility to feed him. The emissary seems pleased, but no decision will be made until he has visited the second potter's village. The book takes you to another time and place, it gives you some unforgettable images, and it engages important themes in a most satisfying fashion. Crane-man had told the story of the city, and the terrible fight of the Korean king and his courtiers against Chinese invaders. Tree-ear tries to fight them both, but he is powerless to stop them opening the jiggeh and taking out one of the vases. They test the jiggeh Crane-man has made for the vases, and now Tree-ear is ready to leave. But he does throw down the jiggeh with an cry of fury. Tree-ear and Crane-man talk about how long they have lived together, and how a kind monk brought Tree-ear there after his parents died of a fever. He tells Tree-ear that he can only teach his own son, but his own son is dead.

Chapter 2: Tree-ear goes to Min's house hoping to watch him throw a new pot, but Min is not there. Tree-ear thinks about how he can thank Min's wife for the extra food. As Crane-man makes a new crutch, Tree-ear feels guilty for forgetting Crane-man and not saving any food for him.

A single shard pottery

When Tree-ear reaches the city of Puyo, he goes up to a mountain cliff where it is said a group of women jumped off to the river below to prevent capture by an invading army. Ethical decisions regarding acceptance of lunch and his responsibility to Crane-man are decided with fastidiousness and rectitude. Next morning Tree-ear goes to the bridge and starts throwing stones into the water. He enjoys passing the stalls and looking at the things that people are selling. He tells her he is happy to go to Songdo with Min's pots. Chapter 4: Next morning Tree-ear takes his own bowl to Min's house so that he can take half of the food back to Crane-man. The writing is lyrical in places, which brings the art and nature in this story alive. When he arrives Min's wife tells him that Min is at the draining site. Tree-ear continues working with Min. Tree-ear collects some of the shards and sees that the glaze is imperfect. Just then someone speaks to him.
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A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park